Asian Hornet Action Team

Miscellaneous Information

The North Shropshire BKA Asian Hornet Action Team can assist with local requests for help in identifying Asian Hornet sightings, nest sites etc..

If it is possible and safe to do so try taking a photograph or even trapping a suspected Asian Hornet. However, do not under any circumstances disturb or provoke an active hornets’ nest.

Sightings can be sent in via the Asian Hornet Watch app or the online form using the links below:

However, you can also email us if you have a local sighting.  Please send a photograph and location details to:

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You can use the contact form at the bottom of the page for the North Shropshire BKA

  • Why Are Asian Hornets A Problem? [Click Here]

    The Asian hornet is not native to the British Isles, it is an invasive species. This means that it does not have any natural predators here that would normally control its numbers and our native species are not adapted to coupe with its presence. When it comes to the honey bee, asian hornets when they have discovered a bee colony will then often arrive in numbers to take advantage of this easy food source. The large number of honey bees being lost will quite quickly disrupt the flow of pollen and nectar into the hive. The loss of bees and the reduction in food coming in can then lead to the starvation and death of young bee larvae, the queen bee in turn will reduce her egg laying. In this way the colony can soon go into decline with aging bees dying off and no young bees to take their place, leading to insufficient bees to carry out basic colony tasks. The weakened colony will become vulnerable to disease and robbing and if they survive will probably not be strong enough to survive winter.

  • Asian Hornet Identification/What to look out for (From the BBKA Website) [Click Here]

    • Vespa velutina (Asian Hornet/Yellow Legged Hornet) queens are up to 3 cm in length; workers up to 2.5 cm (about 1 inch) (which is slightly smaller than the native European hornet Vespa crabro)
    • Entirely dark brown or black velvety body, bordered with a fine yellow band
    • Only one band on the abdomen: 4th abdominal segment almost entirely yellow/orange
    • Known as the 'Yellow legged hornet'
    • Head black with an orange-yellow face
    • Vespa velutina is a day flying species which ceases activity at dusk (unlike the native European hornet which may fly around outside lights at night)

Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown in close up and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
An Asian hornet 'hawking' for honey bees at a hive
The picture is a detail from a photo on the BBKA website
The BBKA Website
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown in close up and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
   

 

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The Association's apiary in North Shropshire

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The Association maintains an apiary at an organic farm in North Shropshire. We hold regular meetings at the apiary during the summer, where members old and new can gain experience in handling bees.

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visionWe encourage and develop
the art and science of bee keeping


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Through group meetings, practical out apiary events and educational support 

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