Bee Hunting: Finding a Wild Colony of Honey Bees - Tom Sealey

Bee Hunting: Finding a Wild Colony of Honey Bees - Tom Sealey

Published on Nov 18, 2016

Prof. Tom Seeley as he tries to locate a wild colony of bees. He catches bees foraging on goldenrod and aster, feeds them concentrated sugar solution and determines the direction that they fly as they return to their colony.

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Some Newsletter Items To Look Out For...

  • The Beelines Newsletter for December 2019

    RSS FEED GOES HERE

    See Newsletter

  • The Beelines Newsletter for November 2019

     
    • Details for our Wax Day Candle Workshop on
      Sunday 10th November
    • 'Getting Bees Out of Winter' with David Buckley
      Tuesday 19th November
    • The annual dinner
      Friday 24th January 2020
      .

    See Newsletter

  • The Beelines Newsletter for October 2019

     

     
    • Varroa-tolerance mechanisms (South Clwyd invite)
      October 14th
    • NSBKA AGM on 15th October 7:30 at Tilstock
      with Bring and Buy and Photo Competition
    • Booking details for our Wax Day candle workshop 10 November
    • Christmas Dinner Date 24 January 2020

    See Newsletter

  • The Beelines Newsletter for September 2019

     

    • The NSBKA AGM on
      Tuesday 15th October
    • Planning our Candle workshop
    • National Honey Show
      24-26 October
    • Photo competition
      The NSBKA photo competition still time to enter

    See Newsletter

  • The Beelines Newsletter for August 2019

     
    • NSBKA photo competition
      Closing date 31st August
    • Shrewsbury Flower Show
      Preparation on Sunday
    • The Shrewsbury Flower
      itself
    • Talk - Apis Through the Looking Glass on
      17 September

    See Newsletter

  • The Beelines Newsletter for July 2019

     
    • Details of the fast approaching Shrewsbury Flower Show
      9th and 10th August
    • A lovely write up of the
      wax wraps
      Preparation
    • 'Joyce's help with
      Swarm Control'
    • Colin's Entertaining
      Diary

    See Newsletter

 

How to Make Beeswax Luminaries or Lanterns

Wax Lanterns with dried flowers
These luminaries have been decorated with dried pressed flowers
There are many variations possible with these of course
 
 

Materials required:

    • Bees wax
    • A container for melting wax (Bain marie, double-boiler, slow cooker, or stainless pot devoted to beeswax melting) and a container for dipping the balloon into
    • 9 Inch Balloons (these make a 5-inch diameter luminaire)
    • Parchment paper/grease proof paper
    • Dried Flowers/Ferns etc to decorate
    • Mod Podge – This is a water-based sealer, glue and finish (Gloss or Matte) that dries transparent.
    • Beeswax Tea lights – Glass tealight holder, wick sustainer / Wick (beeswax wick)
    • Rice, sand or small glass beads (to make a bed for tealight in luminaire)
    • Possibly a hairdryer - to correct a misshapen bottom
    • Newspaper or cloth to work on, so making cleaning up easier
(You can of course use battery operated tealights instead of real ones if you don’t have the insurance cover for naked flames or if you are not yet ready for the high-octane adrenalin fuelled world of real beeswax tealights.)

 

 
 
Asian Hornet
You will need enough wax for ...

 

 
 

Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory

Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory

Wait for it....

Before you kick off, you first need to measure your dipping container in order to calculate the amount and fill level for the molten wax, this is done using just water in place of molten wax and a water filled balloon.

Filling your balloons with water

Hopefully you will have a kitchen tap that accepts a balloon neck size, pinching the neck of the balloon to the tap, fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand, you want it to be about grapefruit size. Once filled and before tying off let as much air out of the balloon as you can i.e. carefully let it deflate until only water is weeping out before tying off the balloon. This is because molten wax will burst your balloon if it hits a part that is only air.

It's a bit wonky?

You can gently massage the balloon into shape if it hasn’t got the correct shape by simply squeezing the balloon a few times.

Ballons
fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand,
you want it to be about grapefruit size. 

Asian Hornet
Holding the balloon, add water into the container
until it comes up to the level on it that you will require
the wax to be on the balloon. 

Getting the measure of your dipping container

Using a balloon filled with water put it in the container that you are going to use, holding the balloon add water into the container until it comes up to the level on it that you will require the wax to be on the balloon. Now remove the balloon and make a note/mark the level that the water is currently at in the container, this gives you the level that you will can safely fill up to with molten wax knowing that it will not come over the top when you dip the balloon in. At this point you may also have discovered that you need a totally different container of course! This measurement also gives you an idea of the amount of wax that you will need to melt as a minimum just to get started with.

 
 

Wait for it....

Before you kick off, you first need to measure your dipping container in order to calculate the amount and fill level for the molten wax, this is done using just water and a water filled balloon.

Filling your balloons with water

Hopefully you will have a kitchen tap that accepts a balloon neck size, pinching the neck of the balloon to the tap, fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand, you want it to be about grapefruit size. Once filled and before tying off let as much air out of the balloon as you can i.e. carefully let it deflate until only water is weeping out before tying off the balloon. This is because molten wax will burst your balloon if it hits a part that is only air.

It's a bit wonky?

You can gently massage the balloon into shape if it hasn’t got the correct shape by simply squeezing the balloon a few times.

Ballons
fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand,
you want it to be about grapefruit size. 

Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
European and Asian Hornet
A European hornet next to an Asian Hornet on a jam jar lid
This picture is from Canterbury beekeepers newsletter March 2019
Canterbury Beekeepers
European and Asian Hornet
A European hornet next to an Asian Hornet on a jam jar lid
This picture is from Canterbury beekeepers newsletter March 2019
Canterbury Beekeepers
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory

Materials required:

    • Bees wax
    • A container for melting wax (Bain marie, double-boiler, slow cooker, or stainless pot devoted to beeswax melting) and a container for dipping the balloon into
    • 9 Inch Balloons (these make a 5-inch diameter luminaire)
    • Parchment paper/grease proof paper
    • Dried Flowers/Ferns etc to decorate
    • Mod Podge – This is a water-based sealer, glue and finish (Gloss or Matte) that dries transparent.
    • Beeswax Tea lights – Glass tealight holder, wick sustainer / Wick (beeswax wick)
    • Rice, sand or small glass beads (to make a bed for tealight in luminaire)
    • Possibly a hairdryer - to correct a misshapen bottom
    • Newspaper or cloth to work on, so making cleaning up easier
(You can of course use battery operated tealights instead of real ones if you don’t have the insurance cover for naked flames or if you are not yet ready for the high-octane adrenalin fuelled world of real beeswax tealights.)

 

Asian Hornet
You will need enough wax for ...

 
 

Wait for it....

Before you kick off, you first need to measure your dipping container in order to calculate the amount and fill level for the molten wax, this is done using just water and a water filled balloon.

Filling your balloons with water

Hopefully you will have a kitchen tap that accepts a balloon neck size, pinching the neck of the balloon to the tap, fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand, you want it to be about grapefruit size. Once filled and before tying off let as much air out of the balloon as you can i.e. carefully let it deflate until only water is weeping out before tying off the balloon. This is because molten wax will burst your balloon if it hits a part that is only air.

It's a bit wonky?

You can gently massage the balloon into shape if it hasn’t got the correct shape by simply squeezing the balloon a few times.

Ballons
fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand,
you want it to be about grapefruit size. 

Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
European and Asian Hornet
A European hornet next to an Asian Hornet on a jam jar lid
This picture is from Canterbury beekeepers newsletter March 2019
Canterbury Beekeepers
European and Asian Hornet
A European hornet next to an Asian Hornet on a jam jar lid
This picture is from Canterbury beekeepers newsletter March 2019
Canterbury Beekeepers
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
 
 

Wait for it....

Before you kick off, you first need to measure your dipping container in order to calculate the amount and fill level for the molten wax, this is done using just water and a water filled balloon.

Filling your balloons with water

Hopefully you will have a kitchen tap that accepts a balloon neck size, pinching the neck of the balloon to the tap, fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand, you want it to be about grapefruit size. Once filled and before tying off let as much air out of the balloon as you can i.e. carefully let it deflate until only water is weeping out before tying off the balloon. This is because molten wax will burst your balloon if it hits a part that is only air.

It's a bit wonky?

You can gently massage the balloon into shape if it hasn’t got the correct shape by simply squeezing the balloon a few times.

Ballons
fill your balloon slowly supporting it in your hand,
you want it to be about grapefruit size. 

Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
European and Asian Hornet
A European hornet next to an Asian Hornet on a jam jar lid
This picture is from Canterbury beekeepers newsletter March 2019
Canterbury Beekeepers
European and Asian Hornet
A European hornet next to an Asian Hornet on a jam jar lid
This picture is from Canterbury beekeepers newsletter March 2019
Canterbury Beekeepers
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory
Asian Hornet
This specimen is shown on ivy and is about 1 inch (25mm) long
This picture is used with the kind permisson of David Walker
The Dungeness Bird Observatory

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The Association maintains an apiary at an organic farm in North Shropshire. We hold regular meetings at the apiary during the summer, where members old and new can gain experience in handling bees.

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